Tuesday, 16 February 2010

Petition against the Scottish Air Gun Ban


If you haven't already done so, please sign the petition (here) to stop the Scottish Air Gun ban. Another 5000 signatures are needed, so please pass the word around.
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6 comments:

  1. You think a yank signature would help or hurt?

    If it will help -- I'll sign straight off.

    Bp

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  2. I'm sure that the beleaguered Scottish air rifle hunters would be very appreciative of your support but, sadly, a UK postcode is needed to vote in this petition. Thanks, though!

    HH

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  3. Well I am still a British citizen with a British passport, so I have signed it.
    Le Loup.
    I seem to recall they did this to the Scots a few hundred years ago, and more recently banned the carrying of the traditional dirk!

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  4. Superb! Thanks Le Loup!

    Curiously though, I think that it's the Scots doing it to themselves - it wouldn't be an imposition of English Law, it'd be a decision of the independent (because devolved) Scottish Parliament. I have an idea that it's a reaction to accidents and abuse of air guns in the inner cities up there coupled with the (terrible beyond words) memory of the Dunblane massacre there.

    With my more pessimistic head on I tend to think that it will go exactly the same way in England before too long. It's already a tenet of the Green Party manifesto here to completely outlaw what they refer to as 'unlicensed' air gun ownership.

    I suppose it's also an indicator of extent to which population and therefore voting clout is concentrated in urban area - people in urban centres don't really have much idea of the responsible hunting culture that exists beyond their city boundaries and so can't really see why such a thing as air guns ought to be legal.

    Perhaps that's a real thing that we 'Outdoor Bloggers' do contribute - the testimony that intelligent life does indeed exist beyond the reach of the Starbucks wifi signal.

    Thanks again,
    HH

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  5. Man...this is one of the many reasons my Graham's of Montrose ancestors left Stirling, by way of County Antrim for South Carolina in 1774: religious freedom and an opportunity to hunt freely.

    ...At least I still get to shoot my bunnies with a pellet gun in California: http://corksoutdoors.com/blog/central-california-mega-cottontails-with-a-22-cal-pellet-gun/

    Though we'll see how long that lasts while we continue following British government with every coming year...Keep up the fight, Lads!

    Cheers,
    Cork

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  6. Thanks for your comment Cork,

    I guess that the act of the English government here is actually to devolve gun laws to Scotland so that, in this, they can be self-determining. I don't really have a problem with that except it seems that when the Scots have their own gun law they'll probably choose to outlaw air rifles. To me, an English air-rifler, this seems like a poor outcome for Scotland's air hunters but, in a way though, it's a separate issue and I can't find myself disagreeing too strongly with the wish of the Scots to be self-determining if that's what they want. To be honest this grant of the right to home rule here doesn't strike me as being that comparable to the persecution that spurred the Pilgrim Fathers to take ship or proof that the same repressive culture still reigns on these shores.

    I can't really see that there's much in the argument that the UK has a particularly grim gun culture when compared to the US either. The gun laws are wildly different over here and hunting is squeezed, that's true; but I guess it's also true that in most UK inner cities you can still pop out for a pint of milk without having to consider whether to go with Kevlar or a concealed carry - and it seems to me that there is something to be said for this state of affairs. The US has much to recommend it - I continue to nurse pipe dreams about Montana and Northern California and I'm sure I'm not alone in this among UK hunter-folk - but I'm not quite sure I think that, when compared to the U.K, it's the land of milk and honey over there.

    The much-derided NHS do patch people up over here without enquiring as to their economic well-being beforehand and if the States were to copy us in this I dare say that there's a few less-well-off inner-city folk who might also welcome a touch of free health care after catching a stray from one of the many drive-bys on offer in the Land of the Free.

    Fraternally from across the pond,

    HH

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